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Assignments and Announcements, MATH 5035/7035 Spring 2019

Please reload this page frequently. Assignments will be posted within an hour or so after class.

Week 1: Fraction divison

Thursday, January 10: Welcome to MATH 5035/7035!

Week 2: Fraction divison

Due Tuesday, January 15: (1) Read all the basic information about the course and see if you have any requests for modifications or thoughts about how many tests to have etc. (2) Read section 6.4 and do practice exercises 1, 2, 3 in that section. (2) Post on eLC: (i) Problem 4 on page 259 and also explain how to use a math drawing to see the original problem as a 12 ÷ 2 = ? problem and (ii) problem 4 of class activity 6M on page CA-111 and also explain how to use a math drawing to see the original problem as a 9 ÷ 2 = ? problem. 

 

MATH 7035 students: begin to brainstorm ideas for your course project. It must (a) focus on mathematics content related to the course material and (b) include a deep discussion of mathematical ideas and reasoning. Please discuss your ideas with me.

Thursday, January 17

Week 3: Fraction divison; Ratio and proportional relationships

Due Tuesday, January 22: (1) Read section 6.5 and do practice exercises 1 and 3 in that section. (2) Post on eLC: (A) Problems 9 and 11 on page 260 and also explain how to interpret your math drawing as showing why we can solve the problems numerically by first giving the fractions common denominators and then dividing the resulting numerators. (B) Problems 3 and 4 on page 268. Notice that you don't actually have to solve the problems. You just need to explain why you could solve them by multiplying by the reciprocal. 

Thursday, January 24  

Week 4: Ratio and proportional relationships

Due Tuesday, January 29: (1) Do practice exercise 2 from section 6.5. (2) Read section 7.1 and do practice exercises 1 and 2 in that section. (3) Post on eLC: (A) Find a simple situation/context that you can model with the two equations 5/2 • X = Y and 2/5 • Y = X and explain why those two equations apply to the situation. Then use those equations to explain why the following is true: to divide a number by 2/5, we can instead multiply the number by the reciprocal 5/2. (B) Problem 10 a - f on pages 268, 269. 

Thursday, January 31   Take-home test handed out Thursday 1/31 and due Tuesday February 5.

Week 5: Solving proportion problems by reasoning about multiplication and division with quantities

Due Tuesday, February 5: Return take-home test. Also: Read section 7.2 and do practice exercise 1 in that section.

Thursday, February 7   MATH 7035 students: project proposal due. Your proposal should be an outline or description of what you would like to do.  

Week 6: Solving proportion problems by reasoning about multiplication and division with quantities 

Due Tuesday, February 12:  (1) Review the 4 methods for solving the Perfume Problem (2 from the multiple batches perspective and 2 from the variable parts perspective) presented on pages 292 - 294. Read section 7.3 through page 302 and do practice exercise 1 in that section. (2) Post on eLC: Problems 5c and 6c on page 298 and in each of the 4 cases, explain clearly what you are taking 1 group to be and, if you use division, what kind of division it is (how many groups or how many units in 1 group). Also: Problem 7 on page 298 except solve it in 4 ways, 2 from the variable parts perspective and 2 from the multiple batches perspective. 

Thursday, February 14: 

 

Week 7: Developing equations for proportional relationships and lines; Inversely proportional relationships

Due Tuesday, February 19: (1) Read section 7.3 and do practice exercise 1 in that section. Read pages 307, 308 of section 7.4 and do practice exercises 2 and 3 in that section. (2) Post on eLC: (A) Explain how to use values of the ratio to solve the following problems from a multiple-batches perspective by reasoning about our class definition of multiplication and a double number line. In each case, be sure to explain clearly what 1 group is and how many groups you are considering. A company mixes sand and gravel in a 3 to 4 ratio (by weight). Problem 1: For 20 tons of sand, how many tons of gravel will they need? Problem 2: For 25 tons of gravel, how many tons of sand will they need? (B) Now solve problems 1 and 2 from part A again, still using the values of the ratio 3/4 and 4/3, but this time from a variable-parts perspective, using a strip diagram. In each case explain clearly what 1 group is and how many groups you are considering.

Thursday, February 21:   Take-home test to be handed out.

Week 8: Inversely proportional relationships; Statistics

Due Tuesday, February 26:   Take-home test due.

Thursday, February 28: 

 

Week 9: Statistics

Due Tuesday, March 5: (1) Read the rest of section 7.4 and do practice exercises 2, 3, 5, 6 in that section. Read section 7.5 and do practice exercises 2 and 3 in that section. Read section 15.1 and do practice exercise 1 in that section. Read page 689 about the 3 levels of "graph reading." (2) Post on eLC: Problem 9 a, b on page 317 and explain how to reason about the strips in the Geogebra sketch at https://ggbm.at/f7xTdkSG to explain your equation; Problem 1 a, b on page 321; and problem 1 on page 680.

Thursday, March 7:   

SPRING BREAK: week of March 11

Week 10: Statistics

Due Tuesday, March 19:  (1) Read sections 15.3 and do practice exercises 1-4 in that section. Read section 15.4 and do practice exercises 3, 4 in that section. (2) Post on eLC: Problem 1 on page 700 and problem 9 on page 717. 

Thursday, March 21:   Group quiz during class.

Week 11: Statistics 

Due Tuesday, March 26: Hand in the group quiz (counts as two quizzes). Links to the Geogebra sketches:

Thursday, March 28: 

 

Week 12: Probability

Due Tuesday, April 2 : (1) Read section 15.1 and do practice exercises 3 and 4 in that section. (2) Post on eLC: Problem 2 b c (skip a) on page CA-316 (in Class Activity 15F); Problem 5 a, b, c on page CA-331 (in Class Activity 15R) except in part a, leave out the comparison with the dot plots in parts 2 and 3; and also  problems 5 and 6 on page 680.   

Thursday, April 4:  Group quiz to be handed out during class. You will have some class time to work on the group quiz. 

Week 13: Probability; Number theory

Due Tuesday, April 9:  MATH 7035 students: First draft of your course project is due. (1) Read section 16.1 and do the practice exercises in that section. (2) Group quiz due (hand in).

Thursday, April 11:   

Week 14: Number theory

Due Tuesday, April 16:  (1) Read section 16.2 and do practice exercises 1, 2, 4, 5 in that section. Read section 16.3 and do practice exercises 1 - 4 in that section. Also read sections 8.1 and 8.4 and do practice exercises 3, 4 in section 8.1. (2) Post on eLC: Problems 5, and 10 a, b on page 742. Also: show how to carry out the Sieve of Eratosthenes to produce the prime numbers up to 50 and explain why the resulting circled numbers must be prime and the resulting crossed out numbers are not prime.

Thursday, April 18:   

Week 15: Number theory

Due Tuesday, April 23: (1) Do the practice exercises in section 8.4. Read section 8.5 and do the practice exercises in that section. (2) Post on eLC: Problem 2 on page 355; problem 3a on page 356; problems 2, 4, 6, 10 on page 361. 

Thursday, April 25:  MATH 7035 students: The final draft of your course project is due -- please email it.   

Week 16: Review and Final Exam

Due Tuesday, April 30:  

Wednesday, May 1: Reading day

Thursday, May 2: FINAL EXAM, 12 - 3 pm

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